NET- Q News

NET-Q Communique Newsletter

Alumni Profile: Sabrina Rollins

College of Education alumnus Sabrina Rollins was able to explore special education research in her classes in the College of Education and through the Pathway Summer Scholar Program, a scholarship available through the COE’s Network for Enhancing Teacher Quality (NET-Q) project that allows participants to design and conduct educational research with a faculty member.

DaShaunda Patterson, clinical assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education and NET-Q project coordinator, spoke to one of Rollins’ classes about the Pathways program. Little did Rollins know that she would not only be chosen as a scholar, but would get to work with Patterson directly on a project examining the correlations between behavior and discipline at home and in the classroom.

“The research project we worked on this summer focused the impact of discipline practices used at home and how it translated into school behavior,” she explained. “We also focused on the impact of different parenting styles on a child’s behavior.”

To continue reading about Sabrina, click here.

 

Staff Spotlight: DaShaunda Patterson

The College of Education’s Network for Enhancing Teacher Quality (NET-Q) project, funded by a $13.5 million Teacher Quality Partnership grant from the U.S. Department of Education, is a collection of programs, partnerships, initiatives and incentives designed to prepare teachers for the demands of teaching high-need subjects in high-need schools.

And it’s DaShaunda Patterson’s job as project director to manage the daily operations that come with such a grant. In addition, Patterson is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education (EPSE) and works directly with COE students involved in the grant.

Patterson recently sat down to discuss her decision to work in higher education, her work with the NET-Q grant and why she loves working in the COE.

To read more about DaShaunda's work with NET-Q, click here.

 

The Ripple Effect

NET-Q makes waves in metro-Atlanta and beyond

NET-Q, which is funded by a $13.5 million Teacher Quality Partnership grant from the U.S. Department of Education, is a collection of programs, partnerships, initiatives and incentives designed to not only prepare teachers for the demands of teaching high-need subjects in high-need schools but to give them the support they need once they set foot in their classrooms.

“We looked at everything we would want in an ideal partnership,” said Dee Taylor, project director for NET-Q. “We wanted to address high-need content areas and build a support system for new and veteran teachers, along with leaders.”

The COE is spearheading this task in true collaborative fashion, partnering with six metro-Atlanta school districts, 23 rural districts in south and west Georgia, four Georgia colleges, Georgia Public Broadcasting, and the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future in its efforts to train, support and retain quality teachers.

Many of NET-Q’s initiatives, including the Georgia Public Broadcasting Digital Partnership Collaborative, the Leadership Residency and the Cross Career Learning Communities, are making waves throughout the state and are sure to make an impact even beyond Georgia’s borders.

To read more about these NET-Q projects, click here.

 

Making the Grade

Thanks to a five-year, $13.5 million Teacher Quality Partnership grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Georgia State's College of Education this year launched this innovative teacher training program, which is helping to make sure that new teachers have the skills they need for success in the classroom.

Similar to the residency programs that medical students go through, Georgia State master's students are working full-time under the supervision of an experienced teacher mentor for an entire academic year. Residents are placed in high-need schools, typically those where 45 percent or more of the school's population receives free or reduced lunch.

Georgia State's teacher residents are paid a living stipend of $25,000 to teach "in-demand" content areas such as math or science. Residents also can gain instructional experience with students with special needs or students who are learning English along with the subject matter.

This year, 10 GSU graduate students are teaching math full-time in schools in the university's partner districts, Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton and Gwinnett counties. Next year, that number will double to 20, with 10 teacher residents in science classes and 10 in special education classes.

To read more about the NET-Q teacher residencies, click here.

 

Other News